Headline News
Go Back
2017-02-16

Texas Water Symposium

Special to the Courier

Photo by Kate Galbraith
Provided by texastribune.org and Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board



The Texas Water Symposium, on creating and maintaining healthy waterways at a community scale, will be held at 7 pm, Feb. 23 in LBJ Teaching Theater, 700 Moore St, San Marcos. The symposium will focus on how local communities across the Hill Country and the state are taking action with watershed protection plans to protect the creeks, springs and rivers they rely on for drinking water, recreation, habitat, and economic stability. The plans that will be discussed bring landowners together to leverage local resources with state and national funds to promote best management practices, restoration, and low impact development.
Water, essential for life, is our most precious and valuable natural resource. But water supply is limited and under increasing pressure from a growing population. How will we protect this resource and plan for a sustainable future? There is a great need for a water-literate public; decisions being made today have far reaching and long lasting effects for our children and future generations.
The Texas Water Symposium Series provides perspectives from policy makers, scientists, water resource experts and regional leaders. Join us as we explore the complex issues and challenges in providing water for Texans in this century. Each session is free and open to the public. Each hour-long program begins at 7:00 pm, followed by discussion time with Q&A. The events are recorded and aired on Texas Public Radio one week later.
The forum will be moderated by Andrew Sansom, Executive Director of the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment. Panelists include Meredith Miller, the Meadows Center; Chris Herrington, Water Resource Evaluation Section Manager, City of Austin Watershed Protection Department; Dianne Wassenich, Program Manager, San Marcos River Foundation; and Brian Koch, Regional Watershed Coordinator, Texas Soil and Water Conservation Board.
Hosts and sponsors include Schreiner University, Texas Tech University, the Meadows Center, Texas State University Department of Geography, Texas Public Radio and the Hill Country Alliance.