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2017-06-01

A Thought for the Week

by John M Grimes

We learn the words to the "Pledge of Allegiance" early in our lives. Yet many Americans do not know the history of the heritage of our flag. They are unaware that the first Flag Day was in 1777. On June 14th of that year, the Continental Congress passed a resolution, legally establishing the "stars and stripes". As a young nation, our new flag proved to be a symbol of strength and victory. . . We all link the name of Francis Scott Key and the then poem "The Star Spangled Banner." Key was held prisoner aboard a British man-of war in Baltimore harbor during the war of 1812. The British were confident they would capture the Fort before sunrise. All through the night with the "rockets red glare" and bursting bombs the stars and stripes held fast. The Americans had been victorious.
In some cases, one flag can have many histories. Did you know that the same flag that flew over the U.S. Capitol in Washington on December 7, 1941, at the beginning of World War II was also flown from the mast of the USS Missouri during the final Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945?
Let us on Flag Day take time to remember our flag and be proud of what it represents to all of us................ the "Pledge of Allegiance" early in our lives. Yet many Americans do not know the history of the heritage of our flag. They are unaware that the first Flag Day was in 1777. On June 14th of that year, the Continental Congress passed a resolution, legally establishing the "stars and stripes". As a young nation, our new flag proved to be a symbol of strength and victory. . . We all link the name of Francis Scott Key and the then poem "The Star Spangled Banner." Key was held prisoner aboard a British man-of war in Baltimore harbor during the war of 1812. The British were confident they would capture the Fort before sunrise. All through the night with the "rockets red glare" and bursting bombs the stars and stripes held fast. The Americans had been victorious.
In some cases, one flag can have many histories. Did you know that the same flag that flew over the U.S. Capitol in Washington on December 7, 1941, at the beginning of World War II was also flown from the mast of the USS Missouri during the final Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945?
Let us on Flag Day take time to remember our flag and be proud of what it represents to all of us................